Lilac Witches’ Broom

What is Lilac Witches’ Broom? Lilac witches’ broom is a serious systemic disease of lilacs for which there is no cure. Infected lilacs typically gradually decline until they die. The characteristic symptom is the development of witches’ broom (tight clusters of short, thin branches that all stem from the same point). These witches’ brooms tend to form near the base of the lilac but they … Continue reading Lilac Witches’ Broom

Clematis Wilt

Clematis vines are a popular choice for ornamental home gardens. Large flowered, early blooming varieties are particularly popular. These show stopping, head turning vines both amaze and delight all who cross paths with them. A fairly common disease of clematis to be on the look out for is clematis wilt (Phoma clematidina). You will sometimes hear it referred to as clematis leaf and stem spot. … Continue reading Clematis Wilt

Japanese Maple Problems…Coral Spot Nectria Canker

What is Coral Spot Nectria Canker? Coral Spot Nectria Canker is a fungal disease caused by the fungus Nectria cinnabarina. These opportunistic fungi typically attack trees and shrubs that have been weakened by stress or injuries like mechanical injury, storm damage, insect feeding, animal damage, pruning, disease, frost cracks, cold injury or drought damage. Once the fungi gain entry to the plant they cause the … Continue reading Japanese Maple Problems…Coral Spot Nectria Canker

Botryosphaeria Canker of Red Twig Dogwood

Red twig dogwood species consisting of Cornus sericea, Cornus alba and Cornus sanguinea are prone to several fungal diseases and their coresponding fungi including; powdery mildew (Erysiphe pulchra), dogwood anthracnose (Discula destructiva), leaf spot (Cercospora cornicola and Septoria) and Botryosphaeria canker ( Botryosphaeria dothidea). Of these fungal diseases Botryosphaeria canker and dogwood anthracnose are both capable of producing cankers on the stems of dogwood. To … Continue reading Botryosphaeria Canker of Red Twig Dogwood

Crown Gall on Euonymus

Galls are abnormal growths that can appear on roots, stems, trunks or leaves. There are many woody plants that get galls and there are several different gall makers (causes for the gall formation); insects, mites, bacteria, fungi, or nematodes. The galls formed are unique to the gall maker and the genus or species it feeds on. For crown gall the disease is caused by a … Continue reading Crown Gall on Euonymus

Daylily Problems

Daylilies (Hemerocallis sp.) are popular garden plants grown abundantly by home gardeners, cities and commercial properties alike. Their appeal in part is do to their long bloom time, adaptability to a wide range of growing conditions and their relative ease of maintenance. There are a few foliar problems to be aware of, and while they seldom kill the plant they can certainly mar the visual … Continue reading Daylily Problems

Juniper Blight

Juniper trees and shrubs are a popular choice in the ornamental home garden. These slow growing plants require little maintenance, are fairly drought tolerant, take full sun and are able to grow in a variety of soil types. They are fairly salt tolerant and make good road side plantings. In addition to this they are evergreens and provide year round beauty and interest to the … Continue reading Juniper Blight

Juniper Rust (aka) Apple Cedar Rust

Juniper Rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae) better known as Apple Cedar Rust. Is a fungal Disease requiring 2 years and 2 host plants to complete it’s life cycle. In the first group of host trees you have Apple, Quince and Hawthorne. In the second group you have Eastern Red Cedars and many varieties of Junipers. The disease can be quite destructive and disfiguring. The disease at maturity … Continue reading Juniper Rust (aka) Apple Cedar Rust

Fire Blight In Purple Sand Cherries

Fire Blight caused by Erwinia amylovora, is a serious bacterial disease that affects purple sand cherries as well as many members of the rose family. Purple sand cherries that have been infected have the appearance of having been scorched by fire. The disease is systemic and spreads rapidly leading to extensive damage, even death. There is no cure only management. Symptoms Blossoms: at first appear water … Continue reading Fire Blight In Purple Sand Cherries

Black Knot Disease of Plum and Cherry Trees

Black Knot Disease otherwise known as Dibotryon morbosum, is a serious, yet fairly common fungal disease of plums and cherry trees (including choke cherries). Other members of the Prunus family (like peaches, nectarines, apricots and almonds) can also be affected but it is less common. The affected trees develop hard, black elongated swellings, called knots, thus the name black knot. These knots are scattered throughout … Continue reading Black Knot Disease of Plum and Cherry Trees

Eastern Filbert Blight On Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick

Eastern Filbert Blight is a disease caused by the fungus – Anisogramma anomola and is native to the northeastern United States and eastern Canada (although it has appeared in British Columbia, as early as 2001). Hazelnuts native to this region (Corylus americana) have proven to be more resistant to the disease (some are even immune) than the imported European hazelnuts (Corylus avellana). For Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick, a contorted hazelnut (Corylus avellana … Continue reading Eastern Filbert Blight On Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick

Boxwood Blight Verses Volutella Blight; Symptoms, Causes and Treatment

Boxwood Blight Symptoms and Causes Boxwood Blight (also known as Cylindrocladium buxicola) is an aggressive fungal disease caused by the fungi Calonectria pseudonaviculata.  This disease strikes healthy Boxwood, quickly causing mass defoliation. You will typically see Boxwood Blight flair up during rainy or humid seasons, where the leaves stay wet for extended periods of time. If the fungi is present during ideal conditions it will begin … Continue reading Boxwood Blight Verses Volutella Blight; Symptoms, Causes and Treatment