Lily Beetles

Lily Beetles (Lilioceris lilii) are a damaging pest insect for lily (Lilium spp.) growers. The pest chews on the leaves, flowers and stem leaving them looking ragged. If the pest numbers are high enough complete defoliation can occur. Early detection and vigilance are key to managing this pest naturally. Damage to Plants Both the larvae and the adults feed on mainly Asiatic lilies and fritillaries. … Continue reading Lily Beetles

Four-lined Plant Bug

Four-lined Plant Bugs (Poecilocapsus lineatus) are small and fairly attractive insects, but they are capable of quickly creating extensive damage to many herbs and ornamental plants in the garden. This is largely due to the powerful digestive enzymes contained in their saliva, which is injected into the plant tissue while they are feeding. Most of the damage occurs to the newest growth, on the tips … Continue reading Four-lined Plant Bug

Cut Worms in Home Gardens

Cutworms are a destructive pest insect of a wide variety of plant material. Many home gardeners have encountered them in the vegetable garden, where they chew through the stems of their seedlings, cutting them off near the soil line. There are hundreds of species of cutworms and appearances can vary, as well as habitat, food preferences and life cycle. There are however several general characteristics, … Continue reading Cut Worms in Home Gardens

Slugs and Snails in the Ornamental Garden

Most people are familiar with these slimy pests, that cause extensive damage to gardens, both ornamental and food. Slugs and snails while thought of as insects to most gardeners, are actually invertebrate animals known as Molluscs or mollusks (along with oysters, clams and squid). They have been around for about 500 million years (BYJU’S, (n.d.)) with about 85,000 known species (Wikipedia, (rev.  9 April 2022)). … Continue reading Slugs and Snails in the Ornamental Garden

Spongy Moth aka. Gypsy Moth

The spongy moth (Lymantria dispar), is an invasive and highly destructive pest. When their numbers are high the larvae can completely defoliate trees, even forests. Formerly known as the gypsy moth, it was renamed by The Entomological Society of America in Feb. 2022. This species has a few sub-species including: Lymantria dispar dispar, Lymantria dispar asiatica, Lymantria dispar japonica, Lymantria umbrosa, Lymantria postalba and Lymantria albescens. They are often … Continue reading Spongy Moth aka. Gypsy Moth

Spittlebugs and Frog Hoppers

There are approximately 2500 spittlebug species world wide (Deitz  L. L. et. al., (2008)). Most of these live in the tropics with only about 60 species living in North America (Missouri Department of Conservation, (n.d.)). In Canada they are mostly found along the very southern end of the country. The nymphs are referred to as spittlebugs because of the frothy, spittle-like substance they produce and … Continue reading Spittlebugs and Frog Hoppers

The Many Faces of an Aphid

Many gardeners are familiar with the little green soft bodied insects that feed on the growing tips and flowers of many of their favourite garden plants. Aphids however are actually a very large and diverse group of insects with between 4,000-5,000 species world wide. They come in a range of colours including green, black, brown, red, yellow, purple, gray and white. Size wise they vary … Continue reading The Many Faces of an Aphid

Fall Web Worms

Identification Fall webworm nests: are composed of silky threads wrapped around the leaves and branches encapsulating the caterpillars. The nests are loosely constructed and messy looking, occurring at the branch tips, and enlarging as food runs out. Large colonies can encapsulate an entire tree in their webbing. The caterpillars feed inside the nest (unlike tent caterpillars) and as such the nest is full of frass … Continue reading Fall Web Worms

Crane Flies And Leather Jackets Turf Damage and Control

These long, gangly looking insects look like giant mosquitos but they are completely harmless (they neither bite nor sting). Their off spring (leather jackets) can cause some serious damage though, (if in sufficient numbers), to the roots of lawns and other garden plants.   European Crane Flies (Tipula paludosa Meigen) Crane Flies (sometimes called daddy-long-legs or mosquito hawks) are long and gangly, two winged flies that look like giant mosquitos. … Continue reading Crane Flies And Leather Jackets Turf Damage and Control

Insect Pests To Be On The Lookout For In The Garden

Tent Caterpillars Tent caterpillars construct their silky tent like nests in early spring in the crotches of trees such as cherry (Prunus) and apple (Malus). They feed during the day, then at night they return to the tent for protection. Your first line of defense should be to begin looking for these nests in early spring, about the time saucer magnolia (Magnolia x soulangiana) and … Continue reading Insect Pests To Be On The Lookout For In The Garden

Springtails

Springtails (Collembola ) are anthropods within the class of hexapoda. Many specialists now classify them in a separate subclass called Entognatha due to the fact that their mouth parts are not external (like insects) but rather they are internal (or mostly so). They are named for most of the species ability to jump short distances by using their tails as a spring board. This special … Continue reading Springtails

Honey Locust Plant Bug Damage And Control

Several Honey Locust trees here in Southern Ontario have been the target of small green bugs that have been distorting honey locust leaves and in some cases partially defoliating these trees. The main culprit has been the honey locust plant bug (Diaphnocoris Chlorionis). The honey locust plant bug (Diaphnocoris chlorionis) are approximately 3mm (1/8 inch) long when full grown and light green in colour. They pierce leaf … Continue reading Honey Locust Plant Bug Damage And Control

Hydrangea Problems…Leaf-tiers

Hydrangea leaf-tiers (Exartema ferriferanum), are a small moth whose larvae, (a tiny green caterpillar with a black head), sew terminal leaves together with a silk thread. Once inside this enclosure they feed on the leaves and flower head. These leaf enclosures become wrinkled and puckered and are easy to spot on the plant. They are native to Canada and U.S.A with the majority of sightings … Continue reading Hydrangea Problems…Leaf-tiers

Magnolia Scale Identification and Treatment

Magnolia scale (Neolecan cornuparvum) are one of the largest soft scale insects in North America measuring 1/2″. They feed on the sap of magnolias weakening them. Their feeding creates a sticky mess that attracts wasps, ants and the like. The sticky leaves grow black sooty mold on them and the beauty of the tree is greatly marred. Identification If your Magnolia tree has Magnolia Scale … Continue reading Magnolia Scale Identification and Treatment